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❶What is Nick like as a narrator? Gatsby knows that he does not have the means to successfully woo her, and must find a way to make a name for himself so he can provide for her.

F. Scott Fitzgerald

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When Myrtle first got married to George Wilson, she thought that she was crazy about him and thought that they were happy being together. I knew right away I made a mistake. She looks at Tom in a different way. She looks at him as someone who can afford to buy their own suit for their own wedding.

She believes that Tom is the ideal picture perfect man that represents the advertisement of the American Dream. Myrtle sleeps with Tom to inch her way to an upper class status. People who are upper class are the ones that have money, drive fancy cars, and have nice, big houses. This later on causes destruction, and destroys Myrtle.

It was later found that Daisy was the one that hit Myrtle with her car which resulted in the death of Myrtle. It is ironic that Daisy was the one that killed her, since Myrtle was having an affair with her husband, Tom. This shows how the desire for a luxurious life and having the American dream, only caused destruction in this novel and destroyed someone life.

The hope for happiness is something that Daisy hoped to have, but by finding out she married the wrong man changed who she is and her over outlook on life. Early on in the novel, Daisy finds out a secret that Tom is hiding from her. You learn throughout the novel that Tom and Daisy relationship is not to most ideal, happy relationship.

Tom seems to be abusive towards her, and rather does not seem to care much about her. Daisy thinks she has everything, wealth, love and happiness which all tie into the American dream, but then she discovers that she has nothing and that she has been corrupted by this specific dream.

She thought she has all she desired for but truly realized she had nothing. She has a child, who does not seem important to her at all. The child is never around, which shows a lot about Daisy. The baby has to be a beautiful fool in order to be happy and successful.

Daisy thought she had love when she married Tom, but truly in the long run, only came out with money. With Gatsby, Daisy realized something that broke her heart. When reunited with Gatsby, who she has not seen in about five years Daisy breaks down and starts to cry. She figures out that she could have married for money with Gatsby but would have had love too.

The ambition for something has thrown Gatsby over the edge. His love and chase for Daisy has taken over his whole life. He feels that he has to live up to the American dream to accomplish what he truly dreams for, which is Daisy. While Gatsby was away fighting in the war, Daisy met Tom and married him. Daisy had always been rich and Gatsby thought that in order to get Daisy back, he needs to have money so that he would be able to give Daisy anything she wanted.

There was a green light where Daisy lived that Gatsby would always look out to. The green light is of great significance in this novel. Knowing this, one can see that no matter how hard Gatsby tries to live his fantasy, he will never be able to achieve it. Through close examination of the green light, one may learn that the force that empowers Gatsby to follow his lifelong aspiration is that of the American Dream. The rain, similar to the green light, ceases to be a symbol, and therefore, to exist once Gatsby has attained his goal.

At the conclusion of the chapter, Gatsby passes through a final stage, in which he is disappointed but, as a result, becomes hopeful once more- thus it begins to rain again. Not only in chapter five is the intensity of the rain especially noteworthy, but also throughout the entire novel weather plays a significant role, always carefully recorded by Nick.

Singularly, Fitzgerald uses the intensity of the rain to represent hope. More frequently, the rain symbolizes negative emotions, like sadness or fear. The Sewanee Review Vol. The Johns Hopkins University Press. The American dream is a tacit promise given to all citizens in this country, which states that regardless of social class, any individual can aspire to new heights based upon the ideology of meritocracy. However, The Great Gatsby, F.

This delusion of the American Dream is the paramount theme in The Great Gatsby, and it is the main message Fitzgerald attempts to convey in his saddening, but insightful novel. Daisy is stupefying and elusive , a crucial character who represents the American Dream appositive phrase ; when Gatsby unsuccessfully attempts to woo Daisy back, this unveils the false promise of the American Dream.

Here, Daisy herself is the American dream, since her voice causes excitement within men in the same manner in which the American Dream provokes excitement. The issue of meritocracy is also prevalent in this novel. It is economically impossible for all of us to achieve the American Dream, which is what Fitzgerald, is saying when Daisy chooses Tom over Gatsby.

This incident symbolizes how the upper class persistently destroys the dreams and hopes of the aspiring middle class to take their place in the elite class. Not only does Daisy symbolize the American Dream, but the green light also reflects the illusion of the American Dream. However, in chapter seven, Gatsby is defeated in his goal to claim Daisy, proving he was foolish to accept and not question the tacit agreement in chapter five that he has finally won Daisy back.

The manner in which the green light in presented in this novel resembles the evident tacit lie of the American Dream. Lastly, the false hope of the American Dream is reflected through the manner in which Gatsby is rejected from the elite class. He reinvents himself into Jay Gatsby and consistently hosts parties in order to be accepted into the elite class.

The American Dream is a persistently celebrated aspect of American society; however Fitzgerald draws from his own life experiences in order to convey that this promise is false.

This issue is so surreal and grave not only because the American Dream is false, but mainly because this ideal has been passed down from generation to generation of Americans.

In other words, the upper class stays in the upper class, and the lower class stays in the lower class, which clearly presented in The Great Gatsby. In the novel The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jay Gatsby and the lesser character Myrtle Wilson both try to reach their goal, their American dream; however, their fate reflects an important statement on the true nature of such a dream. The characters Tom and Daisy have not had to reach this dream because they have always been in possession of it, and thus present a stark contrast to ideals of Gatsby and Myrtle's dream.

In the final passage of the novel, the nature of the dream is further defined and extended. Fitzgerald uses his novel to show a pessimistic and futile view of the American dream, yet suggests that striving for it is an essential part of the American experience. Jay Gatsby is a character who, both figuratively and literally as the imagined self of James Gatz , is presented for the sole purpose of achieving a dream: Gatsby is consumed by this dream and spends the novel trying to win Daisy's heart, spending little effort on anything else.

Gatsby's efforts represent the journey for the American dream, and therefore the American experience. However, the final fate of Gatsby shows Fitzgerald's thoughts on the subject. At the end of his life, Daisy has returned to Tom, and Gatsby is murdered. It is obvious that Fitzgerald has a pessimistic view of such a consuming dream. Myrtle Wilson, like Gatsby, also has an American dream, one that involves going through Tom in order to acquire wealth.

Although we do not see Tom as representation of the American dream like Daisy is, to Myrtle he is the means of reaching her dream: Myrtle lives in a poor part of New York, the valley of ashes, and is married to a blue collar auto-mechanic. She is further away from her dream than she realizes; Tom, although plentiful with his gifts to Myrtle, has no intention of marrying her.

Myrtle is very materialistic, and uses her husband borrowing a suit as an example as to why her marriage was a mistake.

Like Gatsby, Myrtle is killed instead of realizing her dream. The pattern of two characters, hoping to reach their dream yet dying before this could happen if ever it could , shows that Fitzgerald thinks that the American dream is a futile and perhaps dangerous illusion. It is important to note that the deaths are not a coincidence, but are a direct or indirect outcome of the striving for the American dream. Gatsby is protecting Daisy when he takes the blame for the car crash not that he admits to it, but lets Tom infer it.

Gatsby does this in order to reach his dream, however little hope there is left. It is because of this action that he is murdered by Wilson. In this way, Gatsby's attempts for his dream directly cause his death. In Myrtle's case, there is no direct action that leads to her death. However, it is the combination of Daisy's frantic state and Myrtle's searching for Tom, two things caused by a journey to the American dream, that causes her to be run over.

In this way, the dream indirectly causes Myrtle to be killed. Although Tom and Daisy are on some degree representative of the American dream, they are also in another way a direct antithesis to acquiring the American dream. They are of the old wealth, and although the goal of Gatsby is to be accepted into their class, it is doubtful that anyone can truly be accepted into the old wealth.

Tom and Daisy were born into it, and therefore did not have to work to become a part of it. In fact, they look down on Gatsby's class and the new wealth of the West Egg. The fact that this representation of the dream is opposed to the advancement of others shows Fitzgerald's pessimistic view and the futility of reaching the American dream.

Tom and Daisy's antagonistic nature goes further than their hindering of Gatsby's journey to reach his goal. Juxtaposed to Gatsby, Tom and Daisy are truly lazy, frivolous people who, because of their lack of effort to reach their current position, take everything for granted. In this case, Myrtle is the smashed up thing, and Gatsby is the one who cleans up the mess, by taking the blame.

Tom and Daisy are living what others consider a dream but of course, they take it for granted , and they end up destroying those who wish to become like them and retreating into their carelessness. Moreover, their entire existence shows the unfair nature of American capitalism: There is something positive about his message here: Fitzgerald's tone here uplifts this impossible dream into a place of honor, where the journey is more important than the dream itself.

In these final lines, Fitzgerald states that, regardless as to whether it is possible or not, the journey to acquire the American dream is a fundamental part of the American experience. Through the stories of Gatsby and Myrtle's failure to achieve their dream, Fitzgerald portrays the American dream in a pessimistic way, as one that cannot be achieved. He emphasizes this by presenting the characters of Tom and Daisy, who represent the buffer that stop Gatsby and Myrtle from achieving their dreams.

However, the final passage of the novel shows that Fitzgerald thinks of the American dream as more than just a futile dream, whose realization is not possible. Fitzgerald presents the American dream as a need, and one that we will continue to reach for no matter how impossible it seems. It is this act that Fitzgerald believes truly defines our nature: The casual observer may never know the man behind the mask, but a learned historian can reveal to the world the secrets that some would rather sweep under the rug.

Although outside accounts sometimes skim over the less tasteful aspects of his life, Fitzgerald cannot help but betray his true nature to the reader, if only unwittingly. Perhaps his most acclaimed opus, The Great Gatsby, is actually more autobiographical than fictional. Then, one can use The Great Gatsby as a lens through which to examine Fitzgerald, exposing his disposition to the reader.

The Fitzgerald-Hemingway connection is unique and essential for understanding Fitzgerald. The two met in Paris in , and the thriving Fitzgerald gave the young Hemingway a helping hand in jump-starting his career, putting him in touch with his publisher. Acquainted with Fitzgerald until his death, Hemingway is able to provide a full picture of the growth and decline Fitzgerald experienced. The two exchanged hundreds of letters over the timeframe. Both Gatsby and Fitzgerald fell in love with Southern women, and their respective relationships are strikingly similar.

Fitzgerald found his wife, Zelda, at first sight in Montgomery, Alabama, at the tender age of eighteen years old. Although he was deeply infatuated with her, it was unclear if she returned the feelings: In The Great Gatsby, the reader learns that Gatsby too discovered the love of his life at a young age in another southern city, Louisville, Kentucky. Daisy, his heartthrob, was also a mere eighteen years old just like Zelda.

Gatsby knows that he does not have the means to successfully woo her, and must find a way to make a name for himself so he can provide for her. He too knows he cannot hope to compete with the multitude of other men looking to take Zelda for their own, and realizes that he must better himself somehow first.

Fitzgerald does this with the publication of his debut novel This Side of Paradise, which generated enough attention and money that Zelda would deign to resume the engagement. Gatsby conducts similar undertakings: He hopes that this will be sufficient to attract the full attention of Daisy, and he returns to live near her in the anticipation of winning her love. Nevertheless, the parallel is impossible to overlook. Fitzgerald plays the role of Gatsby, and inserts Zelda as Daisy, cribbing strongly from his own experience of courtship.

This is, then, more autobiographical than truly fictional. Despite both Fitzgerald and Gatsby overcoming initial problems with their relationships, they are both confident that when they secure them, they will be set. That is not the case.

Hemingway describes her negative influence on Fitzgerald: But the strain proved too much: Instead, he pours his own troubles with Zelda right into Gatsby, playing out the same scenario with Gatsby and Daisy. Because Fitzgerald could not find love with Zelda, neither could Gatsby with Daisy. Fitzgerald also reveals his enjoyment of lifestyle of the highest extravagance, again manifesting his own inclinations right into Gatsby.

Both Fitzgerald and Gatsby idolized the very rich, seeking to join their ranks. At the same time, neither had to work very hard to achieve their goal. Gatsby, after dropping out of college, receives assistance from his benefactor Dan Cody, who funds Gatsby before Gatsby enters the business world himself. Both men dropped out of school to eventually join the army, but it is clear their goal was always to join the rich.

The lifestyle that both Fitzgerald and Gatsby lead is the epitome of lavishness. Fitzgerald does not know another way to write a book — he has no experience with poor farm boys, for example — so he falls back on what he is experienced with, using that experience to enhance the novel.

Fitzgerald and Zelda were well known in New York City for the grand parties they would hold. Drinking and merriment all night long. Gatsby, of course, was also distinguished among wealthy New Yorkers for the fortnightly galas at his house. This display of wealth and materialism extends beyond just this physical expression. Both Zelda and Daisy wanted riches and the security of wealth; they were both easily wooed by materialism, and in reality, only after the men displayed their wealth did they consider intimate involvement.

Fitzgerald celebrates materialism, and is able to comment on it so accurately, because it was such a key aspect of his own life.

The connection here between Fitzgerald and The Great Gatsby is impossible to miss: Gatsby is more autobiographical, not fictional. The third way in which Fitzgerald inserts himself into the story is in the character flaws that he writes into subjects in Gatsby.

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The Great Gatsby essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

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Critical Essays Social Stratification: The Great Gatsby as Social Commentary Bookmark this page Manage My Reading List In The Great Gatsby Fitzgerald offers up commentary on a variety of themes — justice, power, greed, betrayal, the American dream, and so on.

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Whilst The Great Gatsby explores a number of themes, none is more prevalent than that of the corruption of the American dream. The American dream is the concept that, in America, any person can be successful as long he or she is prepared to work hard and use his natural gifts. Free Great Gatsby Essays: The Truly Great Gatsby - The Truly Great Gatsby Is his novel the Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald creates Gatsby as a character who becomes great. He begins life as just an ordinary, lower-class, citizen.

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Keywords: the great gatsby final essay, great gatsby final essay Fitzgerald wrote The Great Gatsby as a satire that comments on American ideals in the s. He shows the carelessness of everyone during the time by portraying them in the community of East and West Egg. Free essays on Great Gatsby available at godliterature.tk, the largest free essay community.